30 December 2008

Saddles








I took advantage of the weak Euro while in Germany over Christmas to do some shopping for my cycling. I thought I should try one of those saddles that are meant to be softer on your prostate and still look good, and bought Selle Italia Thoork Gel Flow (see photos above).

I tested it on the ride with Michael today. It is indeed somewhat softer on the front part of one's bottom and may thus avoid irritating the prostate, but I found the back part too hard for my taste. My old Selle Italia SLR has extra padding at the back, and I missed that. Mind you - it is just as hard or as soft as most saddles, e.g. Michael's older Selle Italia, which I guess is fine for most people, but not me who I have hardly any fat that would allow me to sit soft (my body fat ratio is 3 percent!).

I will return it to the internet shop (they pay back the full price if returned within a month), but if anyone is interested in it, I'm willing to sell it. It cost me JPY 16,500. The Japanese list price is JPY 23,000, though there are offers for JPY 18,900 on some internet sites. Let me know soonest before I send back to the shop.

Does anyone have experience with softer and yet prostate-friendly saddles?

2 comments:

David L. said...

With saddles, I think the best approach is to find one you like and stick with it. I did -- Fizik Arione. It's main advantages are (1) a flat, broad platform -- which seems to achieve the same purpose as the various slots and holes, gel inserts, etc. in other saddles of keeping pressure off of one's tender parts, (2) an extra few cm from front to rear, permitting additional riding positions -- very nice on a longer ride when you start to tire, and (3) "wingflex" in the sides where legs would otherwise rub, so that it does not get in the way of pedaling or create friction.

But I would be the first to admit that the Arione will not be everyone's first choice.

TOM said...

Fizi:k Arione would be my first choice too for long rides; for hillclimb races I would go for Selle Italia SLR. Otherwise I've tried various other brands and models and I've found all of them to fit me well. For me, more important is the height and position of the saddle. At first I thought it looked cool and "pro" to pull up the saddle post as high as possible for my toes to still be able to reach the pedals and I tried to compensate the height by tilting the saddle tip downward...with painful consequences! At a "position clinic" I was taught to lower my saddle, move it more backwards and keep it in a perfect horizontal position. Keep experimenting Ludwig & if needed, regain some body fat!